1. 22nd Jul 2014

    Notes: 6

    Reblogged from scragend

    scragend:

    Scrag End: Issue One — The Producers Issue

    Available now!

    Emma-Kate Rose and Robert Pekin ask the question, ‘Why do farmers eat shit?’. Greg Clarke of Great Ocean Ducks explains the price of ducks and how he came to be called GOD. In the King Valley, Prosecco rules, and its champions, the Dal Zotto family, invite us into their home. Meanwhile Clare Burder of Eminence Wines explains the challenges of creating a Champagne-style sparkling on the plateau above the Prosecco Road. We re-visit Josh Russel of Cup Coffee on his return from a buying trip to Guatemala and El Salvador, and Sam Pendergast of Fair Ferments explains how good things can still be made when big business abandons our regional growers

     
  2. 12th Jul 2014

    Notes: 5

    Reblogged from scragend

    scragend:

    Toby Scott shoots food that’s gone bad in the best way thanks to Ben Williamson of Gerard’s Bistro. For Issue One—The Producers Issue

     
  3. scragend:

    A day of whole pig butcher & charcuterie at the farm of Tammi & Stuart Jonas.

    The event was held for the greater community of the Jonai Farm. Customers friends and colleagues were all invited to play with the pigs, get amongst the porky fun, share lunch, and sneak a few glasses of wine.

    The full circle of a pigs-life on display.

     
  4. 9th May 2014

    Notes: 5

    Reblogged from scragend

    image: Download

    scragend:

Scrag End Amuse One is off the press and ready to bind. Look out for it on the streets in the coming weeks.

Our teaser issue “Amuse”
is off to the printers. scragend

    scragend:

    Scrag End Amuse One is off the press and ready to bind. Look out for it on the streets in the coming weeks.

    Our teaser issue “Amuse” is off to the printers. scragend

     
  5. 8th May 2014

    Notes: 2

    Reblogged from scragend

    image: Download

    scragend:

To the gents at Scrag End from Ferran Adrià at qagoma

    scragend:

    To the gents at Scrag End from Ferran Adrià at qagoma

     
  6. 1st May 2014

    Notes: 9

    Reblogged from scragend

    scragend:

    Bean to bar has become just one more buzzword for us to add to our repertoires—in the case of Monsieur Truffe’s attempts however, gladly so. Jade Bentley, chocolatier from a young age tells us that while most customers are still puchasing the standard range of chocolates (the Gianduja, made with Italian import hazelnuts, processed in house is her favourite), her recent foray into single origin bean to bar production holds a special place in her heart.

    Attached to East Brunswick’s East Elevation, separated in fact only by a half height partition down the centre of a stunning plant-filled warehouse space, the chocolate factory is a sight to behold. While ancient german roasters and rollers slowly turn bean to paste, their more modern counterparts bear the bulk of the load. Jade works quietly and contently, her love for the method obvious—working effortlessly amongst the enormous machines.

    I visited with Kylie Miller, ex-Masterchef contestant, now pastry chef at Melbourne’s well known Burch & Purchase Sweet Studio under dessert-making sensation Darren Purchase. Listening to these two highly passionate individuals talk all things chocolate and patisserie was a huge pleasure.

    If the aroma and the show weren’t enough to keep you around, the food coming out of the kitchen is unique on Melbourne’s scene. Brian Edwards, once-head chef, now venue manager, tells me there is a lot of work to do until the place is as strong as he would like. From my perspective at least, this is hard to believe as I leave what is a truly special space hidden amongst Melbourne’s urban north.

    Read more by Kylie Miller, on single origin chocolate in Scrag End: Issue one

     
  7. 15th Apr 2014

    Notes: 3

    Reblogged from scragend

    scragend:

    Ferran Adrià signs one of his books following a lecture at Brisbane’s GOMA. During the lecture he spoke about the next phase of elBulli which closed as a restaurant in 2011. He introduced elBulli 1846, elBulli Foundation & Bullipedia, while also addressing the importance of education, collaboration and getting things done quickly, like a chef.

    As always, remarkably inspiring.

     
  8. scragend:

    We visited GOMA Restaurant to sample the new menu designed by head chef Josue Lopez. The Brûlée of Foie gras (top), Lockyer Valley Cauliflower (not shown) & Seared black king fish (bottom left) were simply outstanding.

     
  9. 10th Apr 2014

    Notes: 5

    Reblogged from scragend

    scragend:

    Brisbane has just been treated to an unprecedented food experience. While the city is not completely unfamiliar with good food, Marc Sheldon’s recent contribution is rather special. His brand Flugente (Known to english speakers as the Muscovy Duck) presented its inaugural dinner on Friday evening with encore sessions Saturday and Sunday, exposes Brisbane diners to some of the most exciting food from among the worlds most interesting chefs. The chefs are then partnered on our shores with locals from the likes of Esquire, Gerards Bistro, Stokehouse and Urbane.

    In this first event, Flugente welcomed Husband-and-wife team Stuart Brioza and Nicole Krasinski from their Michelin starred San Francisco bay area restaurant, State Bird Provisions. Assisted on Sunday by Josue Lopez of GOMA restaurant & Alejandro Cancino of Urbane. Nicole and Stuart served some of the restaurants best known dishes, modified to suite local ingredients and the constants of working in an unfamiliar space and limited time.

    The evening was hosted at Wandering Cooks which stands alone in Brisbane as an exceptional kitchen space. Its commercial kitchens were able to support a large kitchen staff and its adjoining event space, accommodated 60 odd guests on the night. The guests where seated on long tables, but due to some clever service the dinner retained intimacy. Dishes were share plates tailored to precisely the number of people in ones group. Being visited by Marc during the dinner and words from Nicole, Stuart and Flugente’s sommelier Paul Einbund, before and after service made for an exceptionally informative and approachable evening. Food of this standard presented so causally is my personal archetype for a perfect food experience, the evening was simply superb. Look out for Flugente’s next.

     
  10. 18th Mar 2014

    Notes: 4

    Reblogged from scragend

    scragend:

    One year ago I was blessed with the chance to visit Gascony for a bucket-list style food experience. Four incredible weeks of producer visits, feasting and well-oiled learning across the heavily romanticised regions of Basque, and Lot-et-Garonne, all in search of the secrets of ham.

    But as incredible as the touring experience was, guided by the well publicised ham-guru host Kate Hill, what was to make the experience truly iconic and invaluable was the hands-on of being thrown into the production within the farm based boning room of the Chapolard family. I was let loose on the cuts and charcuterie that little to my knowledge was to be presented side by side with the Chapolard’s work the next day at market.

    Walking away from the farm one month later, I knew that this experience had to come home with me to Australia. Luckily enough, barely a year later, Kate Hill and Dominique and Christiane Chapolard obliged.

    Thanks to the generosity of the Jonai Farms, an ethical and holistic pork producer based in Eganstown on the outskirts of Daylesford, Victoria—I had somewhere to host them and our 25 willing students. What was to follow was 10 hours of butchery, charcuterie production and in true French style, extended feasting and wine (more on this to come).

    After unveiling the knowledge of the likes of noix de jambon, ventreche, pate de tete & fricandeux as is the way in France, the politics of food were discussed. Opening the eyes of some, and offering others an opportunity to vent their frustrations—this group of 30-odd insanely passionate producers, butchers, farmers, chefs and food advocates tackled both local and global food concerns. It was an unexpected but incredible informal round-table style discussion on the state of the food world.

    Many thanks to be given to Kate Hill for her ham knowledge, translation and good company all the way from her farmstead in Gascony, Kitchen at Camont,

    Dominique and Christiane Chapolard for leaving their 7-day a week production behind for two weeks to share their skills and knowledge of everything to do with the pig,

    Clare Burder of Eminence Wines in Whitfield, Victoria for her incredible wines, salami know-how and event write-up,

    The Jonai Farms owners Tammi & Stuart Jonas, for hosting and helping co-ordinate the day and their three kids for vacating their rooms to sleep on the couch in order to host their guests,

    Anthony from Greenvale Farms, another fantastic Victorian ethical pork and lamb producer for doing a stella job washing up after lunch,

    and of course Mick Nunn, for helping me cook everyone lunch, a Chef and new friend from Ballarat’s Forge restaurant—he is fellow Kitchen at Camont Alumni and rumour has it, future Victorian ham mafia.

    Till next time,

    Sascha
    the editor